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Whats The Next Step In My Treatment ?

Whats The Next Step In My Treatment ?

Hello :)

So , I’ve been diagnosed relatively recently , and my rheumatologist tried to get me on anti inflammatories , but it has failed to work . I’m wondering abt what the next step in my treatment might be . She alluded to bio therapy , but will she put that in place right away ( it’s the 2 nd time I see her ) ? Will she try and up my dosage ? Do you guys have any idea what she’ll do ?

Thank you in advance for your answers :)

A MySpondylitisTeam Member said:

I have gone thru embral an renacaide infussion can’t remember all the other things but I have always taken till they stop working

posted about 1 month ago
A MySpondylitisTeam Member said:

Thank you for your encouragements .

Im sad that you had to go through all that you did , i hope it will get better soon .

I take anti inflamatories such as ketoprofene , apranax , or celebrex ( those are what they are called in france idk if their names are different in the USA ) twoce a day , but it doesnt work at all … so that’s why i was wondering what medication my rheumatologist might give me next

posted about 1 month ago
A MySpondylitisTeam Member said:

Hmm, I was told sacroilliac inflammation is a hallmark of Ankylosing Spondylitis, and over time, those joints can fuse in some people with A.S. Here in the US, inflammation shown on film can be an acceptable part of the diagnosis, along with medical history of ourselves and with our family history too. We often say SIJ issues, or SI joint issues. That's an easier way of referring to those joints, high up on our hips, where the pain is located. Also, I've read that women often have later progressions of the disease, and so don't get diagnosed as early as men sometimes do, as men tend to show up issues in films sooner than we do. Because of that, I've read that women often don't do as well on biologics as men do-because they are diagnosed later on. In my family, for example, we started with A.S. pain high up in neck and thoracic spine, and then it moved down to lower back and hips when we were in late 40's or early 50's, so a lot of our damage seemed to come later on. Many people though, start out with lower back and hip issues. We also share many complaints with this disease. There are other genes too that can be involved. HLA-B27 is common, but I've read that another is HLA-B60. And, other crossover markers too. There are similarities and also we are all different in our progressions. I started out with severe tension headaches and my thoracic back and neck muscles would be all knotted up early on, then work their way up the back of my head until my whole head ached-from late teens to late twenties, then those headaches stopped. I broke a finger in high school playing volleyball. I've broken two toes, one when i was a young child. I broke off my tailbone when I was in labor, and early on i always had more than my share of sports injuries. Overused muscles in shoulders, arms and legs landed me in the ER several times in teens and twenties. These were really painful things to go through. My next big issue was Bilateral Achilles Tendonitis, which I lived with for 10 yrs straight, and always worked on my feet everyday. I suffered plenty from that issue alone. Then, one day, my aunt bought me a simple, inexpensive pair of lightweight canvas, backless shoes to try at work. Without the constant pressure to my heels, it completely stopped the pain, inflammation and redness I'd lived with for years! 22 yrs later, my Achilles are a bit stiff, but the pain and inflammation hasn't returned. Even a simple change of shoes can dramatically help with our foot issues. My thoracic back and neck got the brunt of it. I ached a lot during the 30's and 40's, and even now in my 60's. I just used ibuprophen twice a day and hot showers before and after work to keep more comfortable. It's been easier now that I'm retired and have better control over my schedule. I wish you success in dealing with your SIJ issues and other issues too.

posted about 2 months ago
A MySpondylitisTeam Member said:

I had inflamation in my sacro illiaques first ( sorry , i dont know the english for it ) , and then my back started to hurt a lot . It has been 7 years , and my condition only grew worse . They tested me for the gene , but i dont have it . But basically when i say my treatments dont work , i mean that it doesnt calm my pain

posted about 2 months ago
A MySpondylitisTeam Member said:

What was your symptoms and how do they find what you have?

posted about 2 months ago
Can a Rheumatologist Help With Your Back Pain? Read more >
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